Tag Archives: Exclusive Psalmody

….we mourn over their indifference to and disregard of many important and precious truths of God’s word, and the substituting of human inventions for divine institutions in the worship of God. Especially is the praise of God corrupted by human hymns, which in the matter of many of them, as well as in the want of divine appointment for all, are unfit for the worship of God…

RPCNA Committee on the Signs of the Times (1869): And while we cheerfully admit there are very many of the Lord’s people in all the evangelical churches, and rejoice in all they have done and are doing for the salvation of sinners, and the extension of the kingdom of Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours, we mourn over their indifference to and disregard of many important and precious truths of God’s word, and the substituting of human inventions for divine institutions in the worship of God. Especially is the praise of God corrupted by human hymns, which in the matter of many of them, as well as in the want of divine appointment for all, are unfit for the worship of God—and also choirs and instrumental music in the place of congregational singing. The whole service of praise seems to be arranged as a mere theatrical performance, and intended to please man, not God. By ignoring scriptural and important doctrines, and by not exercising discipline for popular sins, and arranging the worship of God to gratify the carnal mind, the church has been brought down almost to the level with the world, or changed into a worldly sanctuary. And the popular way for the union of all the churches in one organic body, proceeding, as it does, upon the false assumption that the great principles which have heretofore divided, and still divide, the several churches, are of no value, and unworthy of any regard, is a lamentable evidence of the general decline of the life and power of true religion in these times.

Portion from the Reformed Presbyterian and Covenanter Magazine of 1870, page 22.

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EP Objections Answered: Brandon Craig by Christian Herring | Jan 7, 2017

From the Reformed Collective website:

EP Objections Answered: Brandon Craig
by Christian Herring | Jan 7, 2017 | Theologic Thoughts

Craig’s original article can be found here at the Reformed Layman website

Christ Presbyterian Church (PCA) of Grandview, MO

Christ Presbyterian Church (PCA) has been added to the list of EP churches. They are located at 1016 Main St Grandview, MO 64030. From their website:

CPC KC“Christ Presbyterian Church is a congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) and as such we are committed to the Bible, God’s Word, as the supreme rule of faith and life. Because of this, we take public worship very seriously. The Word of God clearly shows that worship is to be ordered according to God’s instructions, and not according to our imaginations, traditions, or in any way God has not commanded. Therefore, the goal of our worship is to be entirely regulated and ruled by the teaching of Scripture. This means our worship is neither “contemporary” nor “traditional” but simple and biblical.

We view the faithful preaching (and hearing) of His Word, right administration (and partaking) of the sacraments (baptism and the Lord’s supper), and prayer as essential to growth and sanctification in the Christian life. While other churches question the Bible’s authority, look to another source of truth for guidance, or downplay the ministry of the Word to become centers of entertainment, we remain deliberately committed to expository preaching and teaching of the Word of God. And while some churches are abandoning or “updating” the gospel, we are purposely proclaiming “the faith once-delivered” that we are great sinners in need of saving and “God saves sinners” through our Lord Jesus Christ.

We are committed to biblical Christianity, as set forth in the historic Westminster Confession of Faith, Larger Catechism, and Shorter Catechism. This is the best known of the seventeenth-century Protestant statements of faith and has been heralded as the finest Christian confession of faith ever composed by uninspired men.

We aim to be what God calls His people to be: a family – naturally and practically caring for one another and discipling one another in the good times and the bad. Our aim, then, is to be a loving community of believers in Christ, truly committed to one another, who live out an unforced and unprogramed discipleship and witness.

Finally, like our forbears, we know that the problems of today admit of no human solution. We believe that the only hope for the world is in the Spiritual regeneration of souls worked by God through Jesus Christ, and so we fervently pray for God-sent revival in our lives, our church, our city and our land. We invite all to come and worship with us.”

Recent sermons on the subject of exclusive Psalmody…

http://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/player_embed.asp?SID=281714101210

http://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/player_embed.asp?SID=21717956321

http://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/player_embed.asp?SID=221171023527

http://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/player_embed.asp?SID=228171910163

“A Most Important Text” by Rowan Murphy

IMG_3964A Most Important Text by Rowan Murphy is available here (for Europe here).

I received a copy this week for review. This work is a good reminder of the role of Scripture in worship. Murphy structures this pamphlet around his central text, 2 Timothy 3:16-17,

“All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.” 2 Timothy 3:16-17

Murphy begins by discussing two reformations that are recorded in God’s Word, that of King Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:30) and King Josiah (2 Kings 22-23). These reformations are of worship and the things pertaining to worship, and so they are rightly compared to the presumptuous worship of Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:1-2). Murphy says, “this passage should cause us all to examine our doctrines and practices, and in particular, our offerings of worship. Is every single element of your offerings of worship definitively and specifically commanded in Scripture? Is it fire from heaven? Is it directly according to His commands, and of His wisdom, and so defined by Him as to contain only what He has specifically called for?” I appreciate this direct challenge to me and to all who worship God. May we issue this same challenge to our dear friends and loved ones who have been distracted by modern theories of worship. May we call them back to a worship that is regulated by God’s Word.

Amazingly, the modern church rarely even acknowledges this clear Biblical warning that reveals just how much God cares about the way we worship Him. But the problem extends beyond worship, as Murphy notes, because 2 Timothy 3:16-17 also applies to “every good work”. The Bible is then sufficient to direct our preaching, our marriages, our families, and to show us how to love our neighbor. Worship, though severely neglected, is but a part of the eternal wisdom that is given to us in the Word of God.

On a personal level, this particular line of reasoning, that the Scriptures are sufficient for worship, was the final convincing argument that won me over to Exclusive Psalmody. I am reminded here of the central place that this “most important text” should have, to show us in part that the Psalms are sufficient for our worship. This argument is presented as a pamphlet, so the only negative is that it’s very brief. Readers may be left with additional questions about the details of how to structure worship with only the Bible as a source or perhaps some counterarguments might be left unanswered. The particulars, of course, can be found in an abundance of resources that are available in defense of EP, but perhaps the author will expand in future editions.

Though short, this work provides us with a direct reminder that we need not look beyond the Word of God for direction in worship. Certainly the inspired Psalms are superior in every possible way to the uninspired poems of mere men, and of this wonderful truth we can’t be reminded often enough.

Enjoy!

Rowan Murphy is a member of Arann Reformed Baptist Church, which is an exclusive psalmody church in Dublin pastored by Mark Fitzpatrick. More information can be found on their Youtube page and on Sermonaudio

Do We Sing Jesus Christ’s Name in the Psalter?

Do We Sing Jesus Christ’s Name in the Psalter? Rev. Travis Fentiman of the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing) has posted a very thorough article to answer the question.

An impressive list of online Psalters…

Travis Fentiman of the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing) has compiled an impressive list of 56 [and growing] online Psalters at Reformed Books Online.

Is God jealous in the matters of his worship? Yes

From Matthew Henry’s A Scripture Catechism in the Method of the Assembly’s 

Matthew henryQ. 52. What are the reasons annexed to the second commandment?
A. The reasons annexed to the second commandment, are God’s sovereignty over us, his property in us, and the zeal he has to his own worship.

1. Is there good reason why we should take heed of idolatry? Yes: Turn ye not to idols, neither make to yourselves molten gods, I am the Lord your God, Lev. 19:4. Has God a sovereignty over us? Yes: for he is a great God, and a great King above all gods, Ps. 95:3. Ought we therefore to worship him, as he has appointed us? Yes: O come let us worship, and bow down, and kneel before the Lord our Maker, Ps. 95:6. And not to worship idols? Yes: for they can do neither good nor evil, Isa. 41:23.

2. Has God a property in us? Yes: for we are the people of his pasture, Ps. 95:7. Ought we therefore to worship him? Yes: He is thy Lord, and worship thou him, Ps. 45:11. And not to worship other gods? Yes: for hath a nation changed their gods? Jer. 2:11.

3. Is God jealous in the matters of his worship? Yes: The Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God, Exod. 34:14. Is he much displeased with those who corrupt it? Yes: They provoked the Lord God of Israel to anger with their vanities, 1 Kings 16:13. Do those who do so hate him? Yes: Idolaters are haters of God, Rom. 1:25, 30. Will he visit their iniquity? Yes: In the day m when I visit, I will visit their sin upon them, Exod. 32:34. Will he visit it upon the children? Yes: Our fathers sinned, and are not, and we have borne their iniquities, Lam. 5:7. And is it just with him to do so? Yes: for they are the children of whoredoms, Hos. 2:4. But will he visit it for ever? No: but to the third and fourth generation, Exod. 34:7.

4. Will those who love God keep his commandments? Yes: If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love, John 15:10. Will he show mercy to such? Yes: for he hath said, I love them that love me, Prov. 8:17. Will he show mercy to thousands of such ? Yes: for the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting, Ps. 103:17.