Is it a pleasure to thee to sing Psalms?

“Reader, dost thou find it so? Is it a pleasure to thee to sing Psalms? Dost thou sing them as an ordinance? Dost thou in faith expect a blessing upon thy singing? And is it indeed to thee the means of grace? If it be, use them more, and thou wilt find an increasing blessing; if it be not, consider well what has been said— repent of thine abuse of this precious ordinance—and pray for grace to observe it to the honour of God, to the edification of others, and to the profit of thine own soul; the Lord give thee a right understanding in this matter.

The neglect of it as an ordinance has led many people entirely to neglect it. I have scarce ever seen a congregation, in which every one joined in singing. This is a very great abuse, because it is defeating the end of God’s institution. He commanded Psalms to be sung for mutual edification. It was to be the service of the whole church. All were to join; whereas among us it is performed by some few, and they are sometimes set by themselves in a singing gallery, or in a corner of the church, where they sing to be admired for their fine voices, and others hear them for their entertainment. This is a vile prostitution of church music, and contrary to the letter and spirit both of the Old Testament and also of the New.”

William Romaine, An Essay on Psalmody (1775)

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Solomon Stoddard on the singing of Psalms…

Ran across some interesting thoughts by Stoddard on Psalm singing in doing some research on Jonathan Edwards. He approves of uninspired hymns in worship.

The second part of worship to be performed in the church, is singing of Psalms; this is a moral duty not belonging peculiarly to the time of the Old Testament, as Christ with his disciples did practice it. So afterwards Paul and Silas, Acts 17. And we have positive commands for it, Eph. 5:16, Col. 3:16, James 5:13. In the primitive times when God gave to all extraordinary gifts of his Spirit. It was the manner sometimes for one man to sing a Psalm, and the congregation to say Amen, 1 Cor. 14:15-16. But now it is most proper for us to join together in singing of Psalms, as Christ and his disciples did, and as Moses and the children of Israel did, Exod. 15:1. As the church of Israel were wont to sing the Psalms of David, so (though we are not forbidden to sing Psalms of a private composure) it is lawful for us to sing the Psalms of David and other Scripture Psalms, the Apostle when he directs us to sing Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs, Eph. Col. 3. hath a manifest respect to the division of David’s Psalms, some things in those Psalms are not so suitable to our present case, so it is in what we read, yet those Psalms are very suitable for us to meditate upon; and contained in them much introduction and encouragement, and because they were indicted by the Spirit of God, are more proper to affect our hearts and excited the workings of Grace, then such as are of private composure.

Solomon Stoddard, The Doctrine of Instituted Churches (London, 1700), 16.

Titles on Exclusive Psalmody from Puritan Publications:

Here are some recent publications offered by Puritan Publications:

1) The Puritans on Exclusive Psalmody – Edited by C. Matthew McMahon

2) Singing of Psalms a Gospel Ordinance – by John Cotton (1585-1662)

3) Singing of Psalms the Duty of Christians – by Thomas Ford (1598–1674)

4) Gospel Music: or the Singing of David’s Psalms by Nathaniel Holmes (or Homes) D.D. (1599–1678)

5) A Gospel-Ordinance Concerning the Singing of Scripture Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs – by Cuthbert Sydenham (1622–1654)

6) Gospel Worship, or, The Right Manner of Sanctifying the name of God in General, in Hearing the Word, Receiving the Lord’s Supper, and Prayer by Jeremiah Burroughs (1599-1646)

7) A Christian’s True Spiritual Worship to Jesus Christ – by Stephen Charnock (1628-1680), including Charnock’s view of Christ in the Psalms by Matthew McMahon. Annexed to Charnock’s work is Jonathan Clapham’s treatise on psalmody.

They can all be found here: http://www.puritanpublications.com/store/products/category/worship/

Later this month, 3 more books on worship will be released.

1) John Owen’s The Glory of Evangelical Worship, with a paper on Owen’s view of Psalm Singing by Matthew McMahon. Annexed is Edward Hutchins’ “masterpiece” on exclusive psalmody called, Scripture Proof for Singing Hymns and Spiritual Songs. Clapham and Hutchins have never previously been published by anyone and not available anywhere on the net.

2) John Wilson’s The Simplicity of New Testament Worship, which he references psalmody.

3) A compilation of works by Samuel Willard, Jonathan Dickinson, Joshua Moodey, Nathan Stone and Jonathan Edwards called Vain Imaginations in the Worship of God.

New Articles at APM: www.apuritansmind.com

Our New Reformed and Puritan Books are available at Puritan Publications!

A series on WORSHIP – New Releases:

        

New Books on Worship COMING SOON:

      

Pamphlets Online

Here are some online pamphlets related to EP posted at the RP Archive. Many helpful articles!

Christ in the Psalms

Christian Worship by Gene Spear

A Condensed Argument for the exclusive use of the Inspired Psalms by R. J. Dodd

The Excellence of the Psalms by D. B. Willson

Instrumental Music a Corruption of New Testament Worship by R. J. George

Instrumental Music in the Worship of God

Is Christ in the Psalms? By William J. Coleman

Musical Instruments in Divine Worship by W. J. McKnight

On Psalmody

Psalm Singing Revisited by Bruce C. Stewart

Psalmody by Roy C. Fullerton

Psalmody by R. J. George

The Psalms, a means to a Spirit filled life

The Psalms, God’s Authorized Manual of Praise by A. J. McFarland

Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs

The Psalms, the Heart of the Bible

The Rule of God’s Worship

The Singing of Psalms in the Worship of God

What Hymn?

Why no Instruments? By Robert B. McCracken

Why no Organ?

Why Psalms? By G. I. Williamson

Why we Sing Psalms

New meeting location for Dallas Reformed Presbyterian Church (RPCNA)

The Dallas Reformed Presbyterian Church (RPCNA) has moved to a new location in McKinney. As of March 4, the new address will be:

1008 West Erwin Avenue, McKinney, TX, 75069

Worship services are held in the back building (fellowship hall) of Victory Christian Church.

 

Who we are

We are a congregation of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North America. In 1743 the first Reformed Presbyterian congregation was organized in North America. We have sister churches in Ireland, Scotland and Australia.

Our congregation’s story begins in 2012 when a group of families with a deep love of Christ and convinced of the distinctives of the Reformed Presbyterian Church reached out to the Midwest Presbytery of the RPCNA. The Lord was pleased to bless these families with wise, godly, and nurturing elders, who then oversaw the formation of this little church. Our congregation was organized as a mission church in 2014. With the election, ordination and installation of our own elders and deacon, we became a particular congregation of the RPCNA on March 6th, 2015.

Lord’s Day Schedule

10:30am Morning Worship
12:00pm Lunch (always plenty for guests)
1:00pm Sabbath School
2:00pm Afternoon Worship

Reformed Presbyterian Church in San Antonio (RPCNA) is now meeting for worship

A new EP congregation is now meeting in San Antonio, TX.  The Reformed Presbyterian Church in San Antonio is now meeting for worship. From their website:

“Welcome to the Reformed Presbyterian Church in San Antonio (RPCSA)!  We’re a new outreach of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America, an old branch of Reformed and Presbyterian Christianity.  We aspire to be a vital, growing community of Christian households who love our Lord Jesus Christ and covenant together to live in Biblical fellowship, so that in every relationship and endeavor, we honor him who loved us and gave himself for us.  Risen from the dead and ascended on high, he now reigns as mediatorial king over all things.  By the proclamation of the gospel he calls men and nations to repent of our lawlessness and trustingly obey him.  We live in joyful anticipation of His return in glory.

San Antonio Banner

“Behold, how good a thing it is, and how becoming well
When those that brethren are delight in unity to dwell.”

Psalm 133:1, The Book of Psalms for Singing

Meeting Information 

We meet at the Quality Inn, NW Loop 1604 and La Cantera Parkway, San Antonio, Texas 78209.

quality-inn-768x500

Link to Google Maps

Our meeting schedule

Beginning on 7 January 2018, we meet each Lord’s Day (“Sunday”) according to the following schedule:

Time Description
10:00-11:30 a.m. Morning Worship
11:30-12:30 p.m. Lunch together (shared crockpots, sandwiches, desserts, etc.)
12:30-2:00 p.m. Afternoon study

Leadership

We’re under the regular pastoral care of organizing Pastor Jonathan B. Leach.  Jonathan received his BA in Biblical Studies from Geneva College in 1981 and his MDiv from the Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary in 1984.  He served as pastor of an RP Church in the Philadelphia area (1984-’88) before accepting a commission as chaplain in the US Army Reserve.  After 27 years in uniform he retired from the Army chaplaincy as a colonel in 2015.  He’s euphorically married to Mary Lou, his wife of over ten years.

As Presbyterians, our pastoral leadership isn’t singular but plural.  Until the congregation formally organizes and elects its own elders, two additional members of Midwest Presbytery join Jonathan on the presbytery’s San Antonio Committee.  Together the San Antonio Committee provides Presbyterian oversight to the new congregation:

Mark Koller, Pastor, Dallas RP Church
Andrew Silva, Ruling elder, Dallas RP Church
Jonathan B. Leach, Organizing pastor and chairman, San Antonio Committee

Contact us!

Email:  sanantoniorpc@gmail.com

Phone:  (210) 347-5116

New EP congregation: Portland-Vancouver Fellowship

For information on Portland-Vancouver Fellowship, contact Greg at 360-433-5883.